A sermon responding to Elizabeth Eaton's statement on the creeds, on where the creeds stand in relation to modern society and the power of clouds. 

The text notes I preached from are after the sermon audio for convenience, however, I suggest you listen to the sermon audio, because there were numerous changes during the delivery.  It is in the delivery of a sermon in the midst of the people of God which is where he Holy Spirit is doing the strongest work within me; and there will not only be some changes to the notes but also emphasis and intonations that don't occur in the notes. 

Sermon delivered at St. Francis Lutheran Church of San Francisco

May 17, 2015  - Ascension Sunday

"Creeds and Clouds" - Lectionary text from Acts 1:1-11 & Luke 24:44-53 

me-play-file.jpg


Click here for sermon audio





A sermon on how to read from one's unique perspective, and how to listen to others

The text notes I preached from are after the sermon audio for convenience, however, I suggest you listen to the sermon audio, because there were numerous changes during the delivery.  It is in the delivery of a sermon in the midst of the people of God which is where he Holy Spirit is doing the strongest work within me; and there will not only be some changes to the notes but also emphasis and intonations that don't occur in the notes. 

Sermon delivered at Trinity Evangelical Lutheran Church of Oakland

May 3, 2015  - 5th Sunday of Easter

"Reading Baltimore" - Lectionary text from Acts 8:26-40

me-play-file.jpg


Click here for sermon audio




A sermon on the nature of familiarity and the love of a Lord who shepherds his flock, laying down his life.

The text notes I preached from are after the sermon audio for convenience, however, I suggest you listen to the sermon audio, because there were numerous changes during the delivery.  It is in the delivery of a sermon in the midst of the people of God which is where he Holy Spirit is doing the strongest work within me; and there will not only be some changes to the notes but also emphasis and intonations that don't occur in the notes. 

Sermon delivered at St. Matthews Lutheran Church of San Francisco

April 26, 2015  - 4th Sunday of Easter (Good Shepherd Sunday)

"Shepherd's Voice" - Lectionary text from John 10:11-18 and Psalm 23

me-play-file.jpg


Click here for sermon audio




A short homily on the nature of human beings and when leaders don't fulfill our unrealistic expectations.

The text notes I preached from are after the sermon audio for convenience, however, I suggest you listen to the sermon audio, because there were numerous changes during the delivery.  It is in the delivery of a sermon in the midst of the people of God which is where he Holy Spirit is doing the strongest work within me; and there will not only be some changes to the notes but also emphasis and intonations that don't occur in the notes. 

Sermon delivered at United Lutheran Church of Oakland

March 29, 2015  - Palm Sunday

"Fickle People, Loving God" - Lectionary text from Mark 11:1-11 and Mark 14:1-25.

me-play-file.jpg


Click here for sermon audio








In which the preacher discovers glory for God in the most unlikely places. 

The text notes I preached from are after the sermon audio for convenience, however, I suggest you listen to the sermon audio, because there were numerous changes during the delivery.  It is in the delivery of a sermon in the midst of the people of God which is where he Holy Spirit is doing the strongest work within me; and there will not only be some changes to the notes but also emphasis and intonations that don't occur in the notes. 

Sermon delivered at United Lutheran Church of Oakland

March 22, 2015  - Fifth Sunday in Lent

"Glorifying Him" - Lectionary text from John  12:20-33.

Listen to sermon audio here




The following is a paper I wrote for a class I took in my final semester in seminary.  Someone on Facebook recently asked me if they could read it, and I'm more than happy to provide.  

The original date of this is May 23, 2014. The date of this entry, however, would be my official publication date. 

 Lutheran Reclamation of the Sacrament of Confession and Absolution

Spirit in the Church ST-2378

Cary Bass-Deschenes

May 23, 2014


Even though the rite of Confession and Forgiveness is available in the Lutheran Church both individually and corporately, most Lutherans are not even aware of it, and even fewer consider it a sacrament. However, a Lutheran understanding of confession and absolution as a sacrament goes all the way back to Martin Luther, and is delineated as such within the Book of Concord, the collection of all of the 16th century basic documents that provide a Lutheran understanding of theology. Although private confession and absolution was subsumed into a rarely used rite during the Age of Enlightenment, it has nevertheless remained a staple means of grace in the Lutheran church, and re-emerged in the Twentieth Century during a period of renewed excitement in unity and liturgy that sought to unify Lutheran rights with a restoration of what was uniquely Lutheran in the 16th century and a keen eye on how Martin Luther and the early Lutheran fathers worshiped and taught. This essay will look into that history as well as the developed Lutheran understanding of sacrament, provide some explanation of how the rite of Confession and Forgiveness is performed in the world today, and offer insight as to how meaningful the rite is and how it can be, as a sacrament, a way of bringing us into closer communion with other Christian denominations.

There was darkness and then there was light. And then Sir Terry Pratchett came along at some point after that.

The text notes I preached from are after the sermon audio for convenience, however, I suggest you listen to the sermon audio, because there were numerous changes during the delivery.  It is in the delivery of a sermon in the midst of the people of God which is where he Holy Spirit is doing the strongest work within me; and there will not only be some changes to the notes but also emphasis and intonations that don't occur in the notes. 

Sermon delivered at United Lutheran Church of Oakland

March 15, 2015  - Fourth Sunday in Lent

"Light, Darkness, and Discworld" - Lectionary text from John  3:14-21 with reference to Numbers 21:4-9 and Ephesians 2:1-10


Listen to sermon audio here




The cross has come to represent many things over the year, but during the Roman era, before the cross became the symbol of Christianity, it was a sign of punishment and humiliation 

The text notes I preached from are after the sermon audio for convenience, however, I suggest you listen to the sermon audio, because it is in the delivery of a sermon in the midst of the people of God which is where he Holy Spirit is doing the strongest work within me; and there will not only be some changes to the notes but also emphasis and intonations that don't occur in the notes. 

Sermon delivered at United Lutheran Church of Oakland
March 1, 2015  - Second Sunday in Lent

"The Embarrassing Cross" - Lectionary text from Mark Mark 8:31-38




The Lent season is a time of reflection, self-examination and repentance. With a new cycle of Restorative Justice starting at San Quentin this coming Wednesday, that inspired me to tie in Jesus' call for repentance in the Gospel text with the Restorative Justice program.

The text notes I preached from are after the sermon audio for convenience, however,  always suggest you listen to the sermon audio, because it is in the delivery of a sermon in the midst of the people of God which is where he Holy Spirit is doing the strongest work within me; and there will not only be some changes to the notes but also emphasis and intonations that don't occur in the notes. 


Sermon delivered at United Lutheran Church of Oakland
February 22  - First Sunday in Lent

"Restorative Justice" - Lectionary text from Mark 1:9-15



Sermon delivered at United Lutheran Church of Oakland
February 15 - Transfiguration of our Lord

"Witness to the Glory" - Lectionary text from Mark 9:2-9


Greetings to you this day my sisters and brothers, saints and sinners, children of God. 

In 2004, a six year old boy named Alex was riding in a car with his father when they suffered a horrible traffic accident. Alex's father, Kevin, survived the accident relatively intact by being ejected from the automobile, but Alex, suffering a severe impact that paralyzed him, and he went into a deep coma, doubtful that he would survive.  For two months his family prayed for him, never losing hope entirely, although the prognosis looked grim

Transfiguration Sunday 2015 2015-02-15 037 (1960x1307).jpg

And then, two months later, Alex returned from the coma with a surprising and incredible recounting. After he had suffered the impact, he floated out of his body and watched his father ejected from the car, only to be caught by angels. He then traveled all the way to heaven, going through its tall gates. He heard unearthly music which surprisingly, irritated his young ears. And, most incredible of all, he spoke to Jesus.

With the help of his father, the paralyzed boy got the memoirs together. Over the years, struggling to get the book published, they found ways to get Alex the treatment he needed, in 2009, Alex became the youngest person, at age 10, to receive the same treatment Christopher Reeve had in order to breathe freely without a ventilator. That same year he became able to stand upright.  

Find recent content on the main index or look in the archives to find all content.

About the Author

I *am* Cary Bass-Deschenes
Written by Cary Bass-Deschenes
Website © Cary Bass-Deschenes, 2003-2014. All of the content on this website is available under the CC-BY-SA 3.0 license unless otherwise indicated.